• Surface decontamination of meat using thermal processes

      McCann, Máiréad; Sheridan, James J.; Downey, Gerard; European Union (Teagasc, 01/02/2007)
      This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel heat apparatus for decontamination of meat surfaces inoculated with important foodborne pathogens using either steam or dry air.
    • Surface decontamination of meat using thermal processes

      McCann, Máiréad; Sheridan, James J.; Downey, Gerard (Teagasc, 2007-02)
      This study investigated the effectiveness of a novel heat apparatus for decontamination of meat surfaces inoculated with important foodborne pathogens using either steam or dry air.
    • The survival of added escherichia coli O157:H7 in natural mineral water and its products and the development of a rapid method for enumeration of the heterotrophic bacteria in natural mineral water

      Kerr, Marie; Fitzgerald, Margaret; Sheridan, James J. (Teagasc, 2000-12)
      The consumption of natural mineral water is rapidly growing and outpacing all other beverages on a global scale. In Europe, bottled water already has a bigger market share than carbonated soft drinks. Yet there is only a limited availability of information on the microbiological safety and quality of bottled natural mineral waters sold within the European Community. As natural mineral water does not receive any bacteriocidal treatment prior to bottling, the risk of pathogen contamination is a public health concern. Pathogen contamination may occur as a result of over exploitation of natural mineral water resources i.e. over abstraction by commercial bottling companies may lead to disturbance of the water table causing contaminated surface water to be drawn down into ground water supplies (Green and Green 1994). Such contamination was implicated in an outbreak of cholera associated with the consumption of bottled natural mineral water in Portugal in 1974 (Blake et al. 1977). The transport and dissemination of E. coli and enterococci in a limestone aquifer had been demonstrated by Personné et al. (1998), confirmation that E. coli can survive the transitory period from the surface to underground water supplies, thus raising the question of E. coli O157:H7 with its low infective dose < 10 cells (Willshaw et al. 1994 and Tilden et al. 1996) surviving the transitory period from surface to a natural mineral water aquifer.
    • A test bacterial decontamination system for meat products

      Ward, Oonagh C.; Logue, Catherine M.; Sheridan, James J.; European Union; FAIR CT 1027 (Teagasc, 2000-12)
      A pilot scale apparatus was designed to allow meat samples to be treated with steam at sub-atmospheric pressures and correspondingly reduced temperatures. Experiments were carried out to determine the effectiveness of sub-atmospheric steam decontamination in eliminating bacteria on the surface of fresh beef. This type of treatment can have special advantages in that steam can be produced at temperatures well below 100ºC. This means that the heat advantages of steam as a decontaminating agent can potentially be obtained at lower temperatures.
    • The ultra-rapid chilling of lamb carcasses

      McGeehin, Brian; Sheridan, James J.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Teagasc, 1999-01)
      The practice in Irish commercial abattoirs is to chill lamb carcasses for a period of approximately 16 hours at 2 - 4°C, at which stage the core temperature of the carcass has reached 7°C. Chilling in this manner is considered necessary because it is generally held that faster chilling leads to toughening of the meat. The objective of this work was to develop a continuous ultra-rapid chilling system for lambs which would reduce carcass chilling time without adversely affecting the quality of the meat.
    • The virulence of E. coli 0157:H7 isolated from Irish sheep and pigs to humans

      Lenahan, Mary; Sheridan, James J.; O'Brien, Stephen (Teagasc, 2008-02)
      Investigations were carried out at five sheep and five pig export abattoirs situated in the Republic of Ireland to determine the prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in these animals at slaughter. This is the first study for the presence of E. coli O157:H7 on sheep and pigs to be carried out in Ireland. Faeces and pre- and post-chill carcass swabs were collected from pigs over a one year period between January and December 2004. Samples were collected from sheep over a 13-month period between February 2005 and February 2006. The pig study recovered E. coli O157:H7 from 0.24 % (n=4) of 1680 porcine samples while the sheep study isolated the pathogen from 2.1 % (n=33) of 1600 ovine samples. PCR analysis of E. coli O157:H7 isolates determined that they carried the virulence genes vt1, vt2, eaeA and hlyA typically associated with clinical illness in humans. The results presented indicate that Irish sheep and pigs are reservoirs for E. coli O157:H7 which may be potentially harmful to humans.