• The Strategic Development of Irish Livestock Marts.

      Hennebry, T.; Pitts, Eamonn; Harte, Laurence (Teagasc, 2002-09-01)
      A study of co-operative livestock marts revealed that cumulative marts turnover decreased by 26% from 1990 to 1999: Commission income as a percentage of turnover increased from 2% in 1990 to 3.2% in 1999. However operating expenses increased by 25% from 1990 to 1999. Operating expenses have since 1997, surpassed commision income, thus putting co-op marts in a collective loss making situation from their mart activities. However overall profit from co-op mart societies (including profit generated from all business activities) almost doubled between 1990 and 1999. While overall profitability of livestock marts societies has increased, twelve of thirty nine marts were in a loss making situation in 1999. Four of these marts have been in a permanent loss - making situation since 1990. All loss making societies in 1999 have little or no involvement in non-mart activities and almost all operate from just one site. In general, the large diversified societies are showing profitability. A number of strategic alternatives to deal with their situation were placed before mart executives. A diversification strategy is by far the most likely strategy to be adopted by marts for the future Most marts are unlikely to consider merging with other societies. Most marts have no plans to downsize and exit from the industry is not considered an option by any society. There is a recognition that there is an urgent need to rationalise the industry, but this strategy is likely to meet with a strong resistance from marts . A problem with rationalisation is that there are no incentives to make this strategy a reality. On the one hand, management would be reluctant to follow this approach, as it may be perceived to reflect badly on their own performance or may result in them being forced to seek alternative employment. On the other hand, the shareholders have little to gain and much to lose if the mart closes. Projections of past trends and impact of new policies would suggest continuing decline in turnover and profitability in the co-operative mart sector. Rationalisation is therefore absolutely essential. The industry cannot sustain the present number of marts. Diversification seems the most obvious option for the future of the industry. In general marts that have diversified are profitable and there is no reason why this trend cannot continue into the future.
    • Study on the Functioning of Land Markets in the EU Member states under the Influence of Measures applied under the Common Agricultural Policy

      Donnellan, Trevor; Hanrahan, Kevin; Hennessy, Thia (Teagasc, 21/07/2008)
      Study on the Functioning of Land Markets in the EU Member states under the Influence of Measures applied under the Common Agricultural Policy
    • Supply Chains Linking Food SMEs in Lagging Rural Regions in Ireland

      Henchion, Maeve; McIntyre, Bridin; Meredith, David; Downey, Gerard; European Commission; QLK5-CT-2000-00841 (Teagasc, 01/04/2005)
      This report reflects the Irish contribution to a 3-year EU-funded research project, SUPPLIERS, which was concerned with the development, innovation, competitiveness and sustainability of food SMEs in lagging rural regions(LRRs) of the EU and Poland. It summarises the results of the research conducted in Ireland, evaluates these findings and makes recommendations to benefit food SMEs located in Ireland’s LRRs. Two regions were selected for study in Ireland. These were the West, comprising counties Galway, Mayo and Roscommon, and the Northwest, comprising counties Donegal, Sligo and Leitrim. Both are classified as Objective 1 regions reflecting their predominantly rural character, economic disadvantage and relative remoteness from urban centres. Three food products were selected for detailed study in each region. Products selected in the West were mushrooms, farmed salmon and speciality foods and, in the Northwest, organic produce, farmed shellfish and prepared consumer foods. This product range encompassed a range of chains from local to international, integrated to fragmented, direct to indirect, providing a basis for comparison and evaluation of different chain structures. This summary report concentrates on the results of four surveys carried out over the course of the study. Producers, intermediaries, commercial customers and support institutions were surveyed.
    • WEMAC Project

      Donnellan, Trevor; Hanrahan, Kevin; European Commission (Teagasc, 01/01/2009)
      The WEMAC (World Econometric Model of Agricultural Crops) model is a model which has its origins at the French Research Institute INRA. Over the period 2006 to 2009 INRA, Teagasc and other partners worked on further developing the model as part of an EU Framework Project. This report details some of the project main results.