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dc.contributor.authorSchulte, Rogier P.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T11:32:11Z
dc.date.available2016-06-21T11:32:11Z
dc.date.issued01/01/2006
dc.identifier.citationSchulte, R., Modelling Phosphorus for Grassland: Agronomically and Environmentally Sustainable Advice, End of Project Report, Teagasc, 2006.en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11019/992
dc.descriptionEnd of project reporten_GB
dc.description.abstractIn 2006, the Nitrates Directive (through S.I. 378 (Anon, 2006)) was implemented in Ireland, aimed at reducing nutrient losses from agriculture to water bodies, i.e. surface waters, groundwater and estuarine waters. This legislation introduced strict regulation of nutrient management on Irish farms. Thus far, nutrient management had largely been based on Teagasc advice (Coulter, 2004). However, in the new policy climate, in addition to advice, compliance with legal limits is also required. This significant change in the practicalities surrounding nutrient management led to a review of Teagasc nutrient (phosphorus and nitrogen) advice, based on the following considerations: Traditionally, nutrient advice had largely been based on fertiliser rates for economically optimal productivity, i.e. rates at which further fertiliser applications would not result in higher economic returns. Now, SI 378 of 2006 demands that nutrient application rates do not exceed crop (grass) demand, nor result in nutrient losses that may have a negative impact on water quality. Previous phosphorus (P) advice (Coulter, 2004) was similar for all soil types, and did not account for potentially different P-requirements, or indeed potentially different risks of P-loss to water between soils. Previous P advice was based on returning optimum crop yields. However, grassland management in Ireland is increasingly focussed on maximising the amount of herbage grazed in situ. With extended grazing seasons and an increasing share of the animal diet consisting of grazed herbage, the scope and flexibility of diet supplementation through straights and concentrates is reduced. An increasing proportion of dietary P must be obtained from this grazed herbage as a result. Therefore P fertiliser strategies should no longer be based on yield responses alone, but in addition sustain adequate herbage P-concentrations in order to ensure that the dietary P requirements can be met on a non-supplemented diet of grazed herbage. Against this background, Teagasc, Johnstown Castle Environment Research Centre, undertook a major research programme, reviewing both agronomic and environmental aspects of P-advice for grassland.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.publisherTeagascen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEnd of Project Reports;5188
dc.subjectGrasslanden_GB
dc.subjectEnvironmentally Sustainable adviceen_GB
dc.subjectPhosphorusen_GB
dc.titleModelling Phosphorus for Grassland: Agronomically and Environmentally Sustainable Adviceen_GB
dc.typeTechnical Reporten_GB
dc.identifier.rmis5188
refterms.dateFOA2018-01-12T08:19:22Z


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