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dc.contributor.authorSmyth, Cyril James*
dc.contributor.authorHartigan, James Patrick*
dc.creatorSmyth, Cyril James
dc.creatorHartigan, James Patrick
dc.date2008
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-02T18:41:59Z
dc.date.available2012-07-02T18:41:59Z
dc.date.issued2012-07-02
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/39302
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/2262/39302
dc.descriptionA common clone (ET3) of Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large proportion of cases of bovine mastitis and occasionally causes zoonotic infections of humans. In the present study, we report the identification of a virulent clonal subtype (ST151) of ET3, which resulted in increased tissue damage and mortality in a mouse model of mastitis. ST151 has undergone extensive diversification in virulence and regulatory‐gene content, including the acquisition of genetic elements encoding toxins not made by other ET3 strains. Furthermore, ST151 had elevated levels of RNAIII and cytolytic toxin–gene expression, consistent with the enhanced virulence observed during experimental infection. Previously, the ST151 clone was shown to be hypersusceptible to the acquisition of vancomycin‐resistance genes from Enterococcus spp. Taken together, these data indicate the emergence of a virulent subtype of the common ET3 clone, which could present an enhanced risk to public health.
dc.description.abstractA common clone (ET3) of Staphylococcus aureus is responsible for a large proportion of cases of bovine mastitis and occasionally causes zoonotic infections of humans. In the present study, we report the identification of a virulent clonal subtype (ST151) of ET3, which resulted in increased tissue damage and mortality in a mouse model of mastitis. ST151 has undergone extensive diversification in virulence and regulatory‐gene content, including the acquisition of genetic elements encoding toxins not made by other ET3 strains. Furthermore, ST151 had elevated levels of RNAIII and cytolytic toxin–gene expression, consistent with the enhanced virulence observed during experimental infection. Previously, the ST151 clone was shown to be hypersusceptible to the acquisition of vancomycin‐resistance genes from Enterococcus spp. Taken together, these data indicate the emergence of a virulent subtype of the common ET3 clone, which could present an enhanced risk to public health.
dc.description.sponsorshipTeagasc
dc.languageeng
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press
dc.relationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1086/524689
dc.sourceGuinane, C.M., Sturdevant, D.E., Herron-Olson, L., Otto, M., Smyth, D.S., Villaruz, A.E., Kapur, V., Hartigan, P.J., Smyth, C.J., Fitzgerald, J.R., Pathogenomic analysis of the common bovine Staphylococcus aureus clone (ET3): emergence of a virulent subtype with potential risk to public health, The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 197, 2008, 205, 213
dc.subjectStaphylococcus aureus clone (ET3)
dc.subjectBovine mastitis
dc.subjectInfectious diseases, Microbiology
dc.titlePathogenomic analysis of the common bovine Staphylococcus aureus clone (ET3): emergence of a virulent subtype with potential risk to public health
dc.typeJournal article


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