Now showing items 1-20 of 2395

    • Qualitative and quantitative differences in endometrial inflammatory gene expression precede the development of bovine uterine disease

      Brewer, Amy; Cormican, Paul; Lim, Joseph J.; Chapwanya, Aspinas; O’Farrelly, Cliona; Meade, Kieran G.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 13/S/472 (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-10-26)
      The transcriptome of the endometrium early postpartum was profled to determine if infammatory gene expression was elevated in cows which subsequently developed uterine disease. Endometrial cytobrush samples were collected at 7 days postpartum (DPP) from 112 Holstein–Friesian dairy cows, from which 27 were retrospectively chosen for RNA-seq on the basis of disease classifcation [ten healthy and an additional 17 diagnosed with cytological endometritis (CYTO), or purulent vaginal discharge (PVD)] at 21 DPP. 297 genes were signifcantly diferentially expressed between cows that remained healthy versus those that subsequently developed PVD, including IL1A and IL1B (adjusted p < 0.05). In contrast, only 3 genes were signifcantly diferentially expressed in cows which subsequently developed CYTO. Accounting for the early physiological infammatory status present in cows which do not develop disease enhanced the detection of diferentially expressed genes associated with CYTO and further expression profling in 51 additional cows showed upregulation of multiple immune genes, including IL1A, IL1B and TNFA. Despite the expected heterogeneity associated with natural infection, enhanced activation of the infammatory response is likely a key contributory feature of both PVD and CYTO development. Prognostic biomarkers of uterine disease would be particularly valuable for seasonal-based dairy systems where any delay to conception undermines sustainability.
    • Dietary Conjugated Linoleic Acid-Enriched Cheeses Influence the Levels of Circulating n-3 Highly Unsaturated Fatty Acids in Humans

      Murru, Elisabetta; Carta, Gianfranca; Cordeddu, Lina; Melis, Maria; Desogus, Erika; Ansar, Hastimansooreh; Chilliard, Yves; Ferlay, Anne; Stanton, Catherine; Coakley, Mairéad; et al. (MDPI AG, 2018-06-11)
      n-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (n-3 HUFA) directly and indirectly regulate lipid metabolism, energy balance and the inflammatory response. We investigated changes to the n-3 HUFA score of healthy adults, induced by different types and amounts of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA)-enriched (ENCH) cheeses consumed for different periods of time, compared to dietary fish oil (FO) pills (500 mg, each containing 100 mg of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids—EPA+DHA) or α-linolenic acid (ALA)-rich linseed oil (4 g, containing 2 g of ALA). A significant increase in the n-3 HUFA score was observed, in a dose-dependent manner, after administration of the FO supplement. In terms of the impact on the n-3 HUFA score, the intake of ENCH cheese (90 g/day) for two or four weeks was equivalent to the administration of one or two FO pills, respectively. Conversely, the linseed oil intake did not significantly impact the n-3 HUFA score. Feeding ENCH cheeses from different sources (bovine, ovine and caprine) for two months improved the n-3 HUFA score by increasing plasma DHA, and the effect was proportional to the CLA content in the cheese. We suggest that the improved n-3 HUFA score resulting from ENCH cheese intake may be attributed to increased peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α) activity. This study demonstrates that natural ENCH cheese is an alternative nutritional source of n-3 HUFA in humans.
    • Can increased dietary fibre level and a single enrichment device reduce the risk of tail biting in undocked growing-finishing pigs in fully slatted systems?

      Chou, Jen-Yun; O'Driscoll, Keelin; Sandercock, Dale A.; D’Eath, Rick B.; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Scotland’s Rural College; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2020-10-30)
      This study evaluated the effectiveness of combined dietary and enrichment strategies to manage tail biting in pigs with intact tails in a conventional fully-slatted floor housing system. A 2 × 2 × 2 factorial design was used. Pigs had either a high fibre (weaner 5.3% and finisher 11.6% of crude fibre) or standard fibre diet (weaner 3.7% and finisher 5.9% of crude fibre). In the weaner stage, pigs had either a spruce wooden post (supplied in a wall-mounted dispenser) or a rubber floor toy as a enrichment device, and in the finisher stage, they had either the same or alternate enrichment item. Six hundred and seventy-two pigs were assigned to 48 pens of 14 pigs and followed from weaning until slaughter. Individual tail lesion scores and pen level behaviours were directly recorded every 2 weeks. Twenty-six pens had tail biting outbreaks and 161 injured pigs needed removal for treatment. Pigs fed with the high fibre diet performed more tail biting (p < 0.05) and tended to have a worse tail damage scores than those fed the standard fibre diet (p = 0.08). Pigs which had the floor toy as weaners and wood as finishers tended to have fewer tail lesions in the finisher stage than their counterparts (p = 0.06). Pigs receiving the floor toy as enrichment interacted with the enrichment more frequently overall (p < 0.001) and performed fewer harmful behaviours in the weaner stage (p < 0.05). Overall, higher fibre in the diet in a relatively barren environment did not help reduce tail biting or tail lesions. Altering the fibre level in the pigs’ diet and providing a single enrichment device to undocked pigs on fully slatted floors resulted in a high level of tail biting and a large proportion of pigs with partial tail amputation.
    • Developing a microsimulation model for farm forestry planting decisions

      Ryan, Mary; O’Donoghue, Cathal (International Microsimulation Association, 2018)
      There is increasing pressure in Europe to convert land from agriculture to forestry which would enable the sequestration of additional carbon, thereby mitigating agricultural greenhouse gas production. However, there is little or no information available on the drivers of the land use change decision from agriculture to forestry at individual farm level, which is complicated by the inter-temporal nature of the decision.This paper describes a static microsimulation approach which provides a better understanding of the life-cycle relativity of forestry and agricultural incomes, using Ireland as a casestudy. The microsimulation methodology allows for the generation of actual and counterfactual forest and agricultural income streams and for other attributes of utility such as long-term wealth and leisure, for the first time. These attributes are then modelled using purpose built forest models and farm microdata from a 30 year longitudinal dataset. The results show the importance of financial drivers but additionally show that wealth and leisure are also important factors in this inter-temporal land use change decision. By facilitating the examination of the distribution of farms across the farming population, the use of a static microsimulation approach allows us to make a considerable contribution to the literature in relation to the underlying drivers of farm afforestation behaviour. In the broader context of Climate Smart Agriculture and the Grand Challenges facing the intensification of agricultural production, these findings have implications for policies that seek to optimize natural resource use.
    • Hydrogel-based Bio-nanomachine Transmitters for Bacterial Molecular Communications

      Martins, Daniel P.; O'Reilly, Huong Q.; Coffey, Lee; Cotter, Paul D.; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Science Foundation Ireland; Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine; 16/RC/3835 (ACM, 2020-11-16)
      Bacterial quorum sensing can be engineered with a view to the design of biotechnological applications based on their intrinsic role as a means of communication. We propose the creation of a positive feedback loop that will promote the emission of a superfolded green fluorescence protein from a bacterial population that will flow through hydrogel, which is used to encapsulate the cells. These engineered cells are heretofore referred to as bio-nanomachine transmitters and we show that for lower values of diffusion coefficient, a higher molecular output signal power can be produced, which supports the use of engineered bacteria contained within hydrogels for molecular communications systems. In addition, our wet lab results show the propagation of the molecular output signal, proving the feasibility of engineering a positive feedback loop to create a bio-nanomachine transmitter that can be used for biosensing applications.
    • Does Diversity Matter? Behavioural Differences between Piglets Given Diverse or Similar Forms of Enrichment Pre-Weaning

      Schmitt, Océane; Poidevin, Aurélie; O'Driscoll, Keelin; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 13S428 (MDPI AG, 2020-10-09)
      This study investigated the behavioural effects of providing different enrichment materials to suckling piglets from 7 days-old until weaning. One object was attached to the pen wall (WALL), and the other was suspended in the middle of the pen (MID). Control group had the hessian fabric in both locations, and the two diverse groups had hessian and bamboo stick in alternate locations (i.e., BMID-HWALL and HMID-BWALL). Piglets behaviour was recorded on D0 (object introduction), D1, D5, D8, D12, and D14; at weaning and 1, 3, 5 and 15 days after. Groups did not differ in approaching or interacting with objects on D0. MID objects attracted more attention than WALL objects (p < 0.01). Piglets interacted more with hessian than bamboo (p < 0.001). They performed more oral manipulation and shaking with hessian (p < 0.001), but more pushing of bamboo (p < 0.001). Interactions with objects increased with time (p < 0.001), especially with hessian (p < 0.01), while interest in bamboo remained unchanged. Control piglets performed more biting than piglets with diverse enrichment (pooled data), both pre- and post-weaning (p < 0.05). Therefore, providing different types of enrichment material can reduce biting behaviour pre- and post-weaning. Hessian was favoured, possibly because this was easier to bite and shake, which were the behaviours most often observed.
    • Conserved redox-dependent DNA binding of ROXY glutaredoxins with TGA transcription factors

      Gutsche, Nora; Holtmannspötter, Michael; Maß, Lucia; O'Donoghue, Martin; Busch, Andrea; Lauri, Andrea; Schubert, Veit; Zachgo, Sabine; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; SPP 1710 ZA 259/7‐1; et al. (Wiley, 2017-12-14)
      The Arabidopsis thaliana CC‐type glutaredoxin (GRX) ROXY1 and the bZIP TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) interact in the nucleus and together regulate petal development. The CC‐type GRXs exist exclusively in land plants, and in contrast to the ubiquitously occurring CPYC and CGFS GRX classes, only the CC‐type GRXs expanded strongly during land plant evolution. Phylogenetic analyses show that TGA TFs evolved before the CC‐type GRXs in charophycean algae. MpROXY1/2 and MpTGA were isolated from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha to analyze regulatory ROXY/TGA interactions in a basal land plant. Homologous and heterologous protein interaction studies demonstrate that nuclear ROXY/TGA interactions are conserved since the occurrence of CC‐type GRXs in bryophytes and mediated by a conserved ROXY C‐terminus. Redox EMSA analyses show a redox‐sensitive binding of MpTGA to the cis‐regulatory as‐1‐like element. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MpTGA binds together with MpROXY1/2 to this motif under reducing conditions, whereas this interaction is not observed under oxidizing conditions. Remarkably, heterologous complementation studies reveal a strongly conserved land plant ROXY activity, suggesting an ancestral role for CC‐type GRXs in modulating the activities of TGA TFs. Super‐resolution microscopy experiments detected a strong colocalization of ROXY1 with the active form of the RNA polymerase II in the nucleus. Together, these data shed new light on the function of ROXYs and TGA TFs and the evolution of redox‐sensitive transcription regulation processes, which likely contributed to adapt land plants to novel terrestrial habitats.
    • Antimicrobial effects of airborne acoustic ultrasound and plasma activated water from cold and thermal plasma systems on biofilms

      Charoux, Clémentine M. G.; Patange, Apurva D.; Hinds, Laura M.; Simpson, Jeremy C.; O’Donnell, Colm P.; Tiwari, Brijesh K; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; Science Foundation Ireland; 14F845; 17/CDA/4653 (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-10-14)
      Bacterial bioflms are difcult to inactivate due to their high antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, new approaches are required for more efective bacterial bioflm inactivation. Airborne acoustic ultrasound improves bactericidal or bacteriostatic activity which is safe and environmentally friendly. While, plasma activated water (PAW) is attracting increasing attention due to its strong antimicrobial properties. This study determined efcacy of combined airborne acoustic ultrasound and plasma activated water from both cold and thermal plasma systems in inactivating Escherichia coli K12 bioflms. The application of airborne acoustic ultrasound (15 min) alone was signifcantly more efective in reducing E. coli counts in 48 and 72 h bioflms compared to 30 min treatment with PAW. The efect of airborne acoustic ultrasound was more pronounced when used in combination with PAW. Airborne acoustic ultrasound treatment for 15 min of the E. coli bioflm followed by treatment with PAW signifcantly reduced the bacterial count by 2.2—2.62 Log10 CFU/mL when compared to control bioflm treated with distilled water. This study demonstrates that the synergistic efects of airborne acoustic ultrasound and PAW for enhanced antimicrobial efects. These technologies have the potential to prevent and control bioflm formation in food and bio-medical applications.
    • Temporal and spatial field evaluations highlight the importance of the presymptomatic phase in supporting strong partial resistance in Triticum aestivum against Zymoseptoria tritici

      Hehir, J. G.; Connolly, C.; O'Driscoll, A.; Lynch, J. P.; Spink, John; Brown, J. K. M.; Doohan, F.; Mullins, Ewen; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; RSF 11S121; et al. (Wiley, 2017-11-24)
      Zymoseptoria tritici, the causal agent of septoria tritici blotch (STB), remains a significant threat to European wheat production with the continuous emergence of fungicide resistance in Z. tritici strains eroding the economic sustainability of wheat production systems. The life cycle of Z. tritici is characterized by a presymptomatic phase (latent period, LP) after which the pathogen switches to an aggressive necrotrophic stage, when lesions bearing pycnidia quickly manifest on the leaf. As minimal knowledge of the possible role of the LP in supporting STB resistance/susceptibility exists, the goal of this study was to investigate the spatial and temporal association between the LP and disease progression across three locations (Ireland – Waterford, Carlow; UK – Norwich) that represent commercially high, medium and low STB pressure environments. Completed over two seasons (2013–2015) with commercially grown cultivars, the potential of the LP in stalling STB epidemics was significant as identified with cv. Stigg, whose high level of partial resistance was characterized by a lengthened LP (c. 36 days) under the high disease pressure environment of Waterford. However, once the LP concluded it was followed by a rate of disease progression in cv. Stigg that was comparable to that observed in the more susceptible commercial varieties. Complementary analysis, via logistic modelling of intensive disease assessments made at Carlow and Waterford in 2015, further highlighted the value of a lengthened LP in supporting strong partial resistance against STB disease of wheat.
    • First Report of Shot Hole Disease on Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) Caused by Micrococcus aloeverae in Ireland

      Smith, L.; Gibriel, H. A. Y.; Brennan, C.; del Pino de Elias, M.; Twamley, A.; Doohan, F.; Grogan, H.; Feechan, A.; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 15/S/759 (Scientific Societies, 2020-08-13)
      First Report of Shot Hole Disease on Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus) Caused by Micrococcus aloeverae in Ireland
    • Seaweed Components as Potential Modulators of the Gut Microbiota

      Shannon, Emer; Conlon, Michael; Hayes, Maria; Marie Skłodowska-Curie; 754380. (MDPI AG, 2021-06-23)
      Macroalgae, or seaweeds, are a rich source of components which may exert beneficial effects on the mammalian gut microbiota through the enhancement of bacterial diversity and abundance. An imbalance of gut bacteria has been linked to the development of disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, immunodeficiency, hypertension, type-2-diabetes, obesity, and cancer. This review outlines current knowledge from in vitro and in vivo studies concerning the potential therapeutic application of seaweed-derived polysaccharides, polyphenols and peptides to modulate the gut microbiota through diet. Polysaccharides such as fucoidan, laminarin, alginate, ulvan and porphyran are unique to seaweeds. Several studies have shown their potential to act as prebiotics and to positively modulate the gut microbiota. Prebiotics enhance bacterial populations and often their production of short chain fatty acids, which are the energy source for gastrointestinal epithelial cells, provide protection against pathogens, influence immunomodulation, and induce apoptosis of colon cancer cells. The oral bioaccessibility and bioavailability of seaweed components is also discussed, including the advantages and limitations of static and dynamic in vitro gastrointestinal models versus ex vivo and in vivo methods. Seaweed bioactives show potential for use in prevention and, in some instances, treatment of human disease. However, it is also necessary to confirm these potential, therapeutic effects in large-scale clinical trials. Where possible, we have cited information concerning these trials
    • The potential of non-starter lactic acid bacteria from Cheddar cheese to colonise the gut

      Leeuwendaal, N.; STANTON, CATHERINE; O'Toole, P.W.; Beresford, Tom; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; Science Foundation Ireland; JPI Food Processing for Health; 2014073 (Elsevier BV, 2021-05-27)
      This study was undertaken to assess the potential of Non-Starter Lactic Acid Bacteria (NSLAB) from Cheddar cheese to survive gastric transit and display probiotic-related traits including bile salt hydrolase activity, the ability to adhere to the gut epithelium and inhibition of enteropathogen binding. Populations of NSLAB, up to 107 CFU/g per cheese were recovered following exposure of cheese to Simulated Stomach Duodenum Passage (SSDP) conditions. A total of 240 isolates were randomly selected from twelve Cheddar cheeses and assessed for probiotic traits. Two strains Lactobacillus paracasei DPC 7150 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus DPC 7102 showed the most probiotic potential. The Lb. paracasei and Lb. rhamnosus strains displayed adhesion rates of 64% and 79%, respectively and inhibited binding of pathogenic Escherichia coli by >20%. This research demonstrates that Cheddar cheese harbours potentially beneficial bacteria, a large portion of which can survive simulated digestion and potentially exhibit health beneficial effects once ingested.
    • Is urban growing of fruit and vegetables associated with better diet quality and what mediates this relationship? Evidence from a cross-sectional survey.

      Mead, Bethan; Christiansen, Paul; Davies, Jessica; Falagán, Natalia; Kourmpetli, Sofia; Liu, Lingxuan; Walsh, Lael; Hardman, Charlotte; Global Food Security's ‘Resilience of the UK Food System Programme’; BBSRC; et al. (Elsevier, 2021-03-18)
      Urban agriculture (UA), the growing of fruits and vegetables in urban and peri-urban areas, may improve food security and access, public health and dietary quality on both a broad and personal scale. However, there is little research on the relationship between UA and diet, and potential mediating factors are also unclear. This study aimed to investigate if proximity to and engagement with UA is associated with better diet quality, and what accounts for this relationship. UK-based adults (N = 583, 69% Female) completed measures of proximity to and engagement with UA, perceived access to fruits and vegetables, health and ethical food choice motivations, connection with nature, psychological distress and dietary quality in an online survey. Participants were recruited from UA-related groups and the general public. Proposed relationships were analysed using a structural equation model. Greater proximity to and engagement with UA was associated with greater perceived access to fruits and vegetables, more health-related food choice motivations, more ethical-related food choice, feeling more connected with nature, and, surprisingly greater psychological distress. Furthermore, proximity to and engagement with UA was indirectly associated with better diet quality via health-, and ethical-related, food choice motivations. While the direct pathway between proximity to and engagement with UA and diet quality was not significant, UA is associated with better diet quality, partly via healthier and ethical food choice motivations. Upscaling UA may have benefits for dietary quality via these factors, and more research is needed to test causal relationships and understand these complex interactions.
    • Influence of chaperone-like activity of caseinomacropeptide on the gelation behaviour of whey proteins at pH 6.4 and 7.2.

      Gaspard, Sophie J.; Sharma, Prateek; Fitzgerald, Ciarán; Tobin, John T.; O’Mahony, James A.; Kelly, Alan L.; Brodkorb, Andre; Dairy Research Ireland; Teagasc Walsh Fellowship Programme; European Union; et al. (Elsevier, 2020-08-15)
      The effect of caseinomacropeptide (CMP) on the heat-induced denaturation and gelation of whey proteins (2.5–10%, w/v) at pH 6.4 and 7.2, at a whey protein:CMP ratio of 1:0.9 (w/w), was investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), oscillatory rheology (90 °C for 20 min) and confocal microscopy. Greater frequency-dependence in the presence of CMP suggested that the repulsive interactions between CMP and the whey proteins affected the network generated by the non-heated whey protein samples. At pH 6.4 or 7.2, CMP increased the temperature of denaturation of β-lactoglobulin by up to 3 °C and increased the gelation temperature by up to 7 °C. The inclusion of CMP strongly affected the structure of the heat-induced whey protein gels, resulting in a finer stranded structure at pH 6.4 and 7.2. The presence of CMP combined with a lower heating rate (2 °C/min) prevented the formation of a solid gel of whey proteins after heating for 20 min at 90 °C and at pH 7.2. These results show the potential of CMP for control of whey protein denaturation and gelation.
    • Human dynamics and the intergenerational farm transfer process in later life: A roadmap for future generational renewal in agriculture policy

      Conway, Shane Francis; McDonagh, John; Farrell, Maura; Kinsella, Anne; National University of Ireland, Galway; Geographical Society of Ireland (International Farm Management Association and Institute of Agricultural Management, 2019)
      The senior generation’s reluctance and indeed resistance to alter the status quo of the existing management and ownership structure of their family farm is undoubtedly strong within the farming community. This phenomenon has resulted in extraordinary socio-economic challenges for young people aspiring to embark on a career in farming. The reasons why older farmers fail to plan effectively and expeditiously for the future are expansive, and range from the potential loss of identity, status and power that may occur as a result of engaging in the process, to the intrinsic multi-level relationship farmers have with their farms. These so-called ‘soft issues’ i.e. the emotional and social dimensions involved, are the issues that distort and dominate the older generation’s decisions on the future trajectory of the farm. These really are the ‘hard issues’. This paper draws on three interrelated journal articles exploring the complex human dynamics influencing the decision-making processes surrounding farm succession and retirement to put forth a series of recommendations that sensitively deal with problematic issues surrounding generational renewal in agriculture, whilst also ensuring farmers’ emotional wellbeing in later life.
    • Mobilising Land Mobility in the European Union: An Under-Researched Phenomenon

      Conway, Shane Francis; Farrell, Maura; McDonagh, John; Kinsella, Anne (International Farm Management Association and Institute of Agricultural Management, 2020)
      Interest in land mobility and its impact on the structural development and economic growth of the agricultural sector has grown considerably amid concerns about the ageing European farming population. There have been calls throughout Europe for structural and institutional deterrents obstructing the passage of farmland from the older to younger generation of farmers to overcome this phenomenon and help facilitate generational renewal in agriculture. Nonetheless, gaining access to land is widely reported to be the single largest barrier facing young people attempting to enter farming. Whilst land mobility is given homogenous importance throughout Europe, this view point paper highlights that policies and regulations relating to land differ considerably across EU Member States. There is also a surprising scarcity of literature and academic discussion on access to land in a European context, despite its crucial role in the survival, continuity and future prosperity of the farming industry and the broader sustainability of rural communities. By focussing on the key policy and structural issues hampering access to agricultural land throughout Europe, and using the Republic of Ireland’s Land Mobility Service as a good practice example of how to help facilitate the process, this paper provides a rationale for why a major European study is required to investigate the factors which influence land mobility in each of the 27 EU Member States in order to inform future Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) Strategic Plans, particularly in relation to generational renewal objectives.
    • Till death do us part: Exploring the Irish farmer-farm relationship in later life through the lens of ‘Insideness’

      Conway, Shane Francis; McDonagh, John; Farrell, Maura; Kinsella, Anne; National University of Ireland, Galway; Geographical Society of Ireland (International Farm Management Association and Institute of Agricultural Management, 2018)
      The senior generation’s unwillingness to relinquish managerial duties and retire is a globally recognized characteristic of intergenerational family farm transfer. This is despite the array of financial incentives put in place to stimulate and entice the process. Applying Rowles’ concept of ‘insideness’ as a theoretical framework, this paper brings into focus the suitability and appropriateness of previous and existing farm transfer policy strategies, by presenting an insightful, nuanced analysis of the deeply embedded attachment older farmers have with their farms, and how such a bond can stifle the necessary hand over of the farm business to the next generation. This research employs a multi-method triangulation design, consisting of a self-administered questionnaire and an Irish adaptation of the International FARMTRANSFERS Survey in conjunction with complimentary Problem-Centred Interviews, to generate a comprehensive insight into the intricate, multi-level farmer-farm relationship in later life. The overriding themes to emerge from the content analysis of the empirical research are farmer’s inherit desire to stay rooted in place in old age and also to maintain legitimate connectedness within the farming community by remaining active and productive on the farm. Additionally, there is a strong sense of nostalgia attributed to the farm, as it is found to represent a mosaic of the farmer’s achievements as well as being a landscape of memories. The paper concludes by suggesting that a greater focus on the farmer-farm relationship has the potential to finally unite farm transfer policy efforts with the mind-set of its targeted audience, after decades of disconnect.
    • Development and validation of a quantitative confirmatory method for 30 β-lactam antibiotics in bovine muscle using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry

      Di Rocco, Melissa; Moloney, Mary; O’Beirne, T.; Earley, S.; Berendsen, B.; Furey, A.; Danaher, Martin; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 13/F484 (Elsevier BV, 2017-06)
      A method was developed for the confirmatory and quantitative analysis of 30 β-lactam antibiotic residues in bovine muscle. The method includes 12 penicillins (amoxicillin, ampicillin, cloxacillin, dicloxacillin, mecillinam, methicillin, nafcillin, oxacillin, penicillin G, penicillin V, piperacillin, ticarcillin), 12 cephalosporins (cefacetrile, cefadroxil, cephalexin, cefalonium, cefazolin, cefoperazone, cefotaxime, cefquinome, cefuroxime, desacetyl cephapirin, desfuroylceftiofur cysteine disulfide, desfuroylceftiofur dimer), five carbapenems (biapenem, doripenem, ertapenem, imipenem, meropenem) and faropenem. Samples were extracted using a simple solvent extraction with acetonitrile:water (80:20, v/v) and C18 dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up, followed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC–MS/MS) detection. Chromatography was performed on a reversed phase CSH C18 column, using a binary gradient separation comprising of 0.01% formic acid and 0.2 mM ammonium acetate in water (mobile phase A) and 0.01% formic acid in acetonitrile (mobile phase B). The mass spectrometer was operated in the positive electrospray ionisation mode (ESI(+)). Validation was performed following the 2002/657/EC guidelines. Trueness ranged between 69% and 143% and precision ranged between 2.0% and 29.9% under within-laboratory reproducibility conditions. The developed method uses minimal sample preparation and 30 test samples can be analysed by a single analyst in a single day. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first method for carbapenems in foodstuff that does not require derivatisation.
    • Improving the chromatographic selectivity of β-lactam residue analysis in milk using phenyl-column chemistry prior to detection by tandem mass spectrometry

      Di Rocco, Melissa; Moloney, Mary; Haren, Deirdre; Gutierrez, Montserrat; Earley, Seán; Berendsen, Bjorn; Furey, Ambrose; Danaher, Martin; Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine; 13/F484 (Springer Science and Business Media LLC, 2020-05-23)
      Analyte isobaric interferences can limit the development of a comprehensive analytical method for the quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry profiling of an important cohort of veterinary drugs. In this work, a selective chromatographic separation was developed for the analysis of 32 β-lactam antibiotic residues (12 penicillins, 14 cephalosporins, five carbapenems and faropenem) in milk samples. A range of analytical columns with different stationary phases and mobile phases were evaluated for retention and separation of the β-lactam compounds. Results showed that, among the columns tested, only phenyl-hexyl could adequately separate ampicillin from cephalexin and amoxicillin from cefadroxil, which had shown isobaric interferences on a number of stationary phases. Chromatography was performed using a water/acetonitrile binary gradient with formic acid and ammonium acetate. The β-lactam residues were extracted from the milk samples using a water:acetonitrile solution and purified by C18 dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) clean-up, followed by concentration under nitrogen and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) determination. Analytes were monitored in positive electrospray ionisation mode (ESI(+)). Possible interfering matrix effects were overcome by using 13 internal standards. The method was fully validated according to 2002/657/EC guidelines, showing satisfactory performance characteristics. Under within-laboratory reproducibility conditions, trueness and precision ranged from 91 to 130% and from 1.4 to 38.6%, respectively. Decision limits (CCα) were in the range 2.1–133 μg kg−1. Limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) ranged between 0.0090 and 1.5 μg kg−1 and from 0.030 to 5.0 μg kg−1, respectively.
    • Protein quality and quantity influence the effect of dietary fat on weight gain and tissue partitioning via host-microbiota changes

      Nychyk, Oleksandr; Barton, Wiley; Rudolf, Agata M.; Boscaini, Serena; Walsh, Aaron; Bastiaanssen, Thomaz F.S.; Giblin, Linda; Cormican, Paul; Chen, Liang; Piotrowicz, Yolanda; et al. (Elsevier BV, 2021-05-11)
      We investigated how protein quantity (10%–30%) and quality (casein and whey) interact with dietary fat (20%–55%) to affect metabolic health in adult mice. Although dietary fat was the main driver of body weight gain and individual tissue weight, high (30%) casein intake accentuated and high whey intake reduced the negative metabolic aspects of high fat. Jejunum and liver transcriptomics revealed increased intestinal permeability, low-grade inflammation, altered lipid metabolism, and liver dysfunction in casein-fed but not whey-fed animals. These differential effects were accompanied by altered gut size and microbial functions related to amino acid degradation and lipid metabolism. Fecal microbiota transfer confirmed that the casein microbiota increases and the whey microbiota impedes weight gain. These data show that the effects of dietary fat on weight gain and tissue partitioning are further influenced by the quantity and quality of the associated protein, primarily via effects on the microbiota.